Gum graft

A gum graft is a dental surgical procedure that involves removing a piece of tissue from the palate which is the donor area to graft it onto an area of ​​gum tissue that has regressed or has exposed tooth roots.

Connective tissue graft

Connective tissue graft is a grafting technique that involves removing connective tissue from the palate and grafting this tissue to the affected area. This technique is often used to cover exposed roots and reduce tooth sensitivity.

Free autogenous graft

Free gingival grafting is a technique that involves removing gum tissue from the palate and grafting that tissue to the affected area. This technique is often used to stop gum recession.

Synthetic graft

Synthetic grafting is a grafting technique that uses synthetic materials to replace missing tissue. This technique is often used to restore lost bone and gum tissue.

Allograft

Allograft is a transplant technique that involves using tissue from a human donor to replace missing tissue. This technique is used to restore lost gum tissue.

Xenograft

Xenograft is a transplant technique that involves using animal tissue to replace missing tissue. This technique is used to restore lost bone and gum tissue.

Guided tissue regeneration

Guided tissue regeneration is a technique that uses a membrane to guide the growth of new tissue. This technique is used to restore lost bone and gum tissue.

Frequently Asked Questions

You may need a gum graft if your gums have receded due to gum disease, brushing too hard, or other factors. Receding gums can expose the root of the tooth, making it more susceptible to decay and other damage. Gum grafting can help protect the tooth and improve your oral health.

There are several types of gum grafting procedures, but they usually involve taking healthy gum tissue from one area of ​​the mouth and grafting it onto the area where the gums are damaged or receded. The tissue is usually taken from the palate.

The procedure itself is usually performed under local anesthesia, so you shouldn’t feel any pain during the procedure. However, you might experience some discomfort and pain in the days following the procedure.

As with any surgery, there is a risk of infection, bleeding, or other complications. However, these risks are generally low with gum grafting.

You will need to avoid brushing or flossing the treated area for a week after the procedure. You should be able to resume your normal oral hygiene routine after this time.

Insurance coverage varies depending on your individual plan and the reason for the procedure. Our team can help you with the steps you will have to take to check whether your insurance will cover the cost of the gum graft and what your personal expenses will be.