X-rays

X-ray is a modern imaging technique used in dentistry to capture high quality images of a patient’s teeth, gums and jawbone. This technology uses digital sensors instead of traditional x-ray film to capture images, which are then instantly available for review on a computer screen. These x-rays offer several advantages over traditional x-rays, including lower radiation exposure, faster processing times, and clearer images. With these, dentists can more easily and accurately diagnose dental problems, plan treatments, and monitor the progression of dental conditions over time.

Bitewing X-rays

Bitewing x-rays are used to capture images between the teeth. These x-rays allow dentists to examine teeth for cavities and other problems that may be developing. They are typically used during dental exams performed during a cleaning to monitor a patient's oral health.

Panoramic x-rays

Panoramic X-rays capture images of the entire mouth, including the teeth, jaw, and sinuses. These X-rays are particularly useful for identifying problems such as impacted teeth, bone abnormalities, and cysts.

Periapical radiographs

Periapical X-rays are used to capture individual images of a tooth from root to crown. These X-rays are particularly useful for identifying problems such as tooth fractures, abscesses, and bone loss around the tooth. They are also used to monitor the health of a tooth after root canal treatment.

Volumetric Cone Beam Tomography

Volumetric cone beam tomograms are a type of 3D X-ray that captures images of the teeth and jawbone. This type of x-ray is particularly useful for identifying problems such as low bone density, fractures and the positioning of impacted teeth. Volumetric cone-beam tomograms are commonly used in different dental procedures, especially in the planning and placement of dental implants.

Intraoral cameras

Intraoral cameras are small, portable cameras that capture high-quality images of teeth and gums. These cameras allow dentists to view the mouth from different angles and zoom in on specific areas of concern. Intraoral cameras are particularly useful for patient education, allowing them to see and understand issues affecting their oral health. Photos taken by intraoral camera do not emit radiation.

Cephalometric x-rays

Cephalometric x-rays are used to capture images of the entire skull, including the teeth and jawbone. These x-rays are particularly helpful in identifying issues such as skeletal growth abnormalities, jaw misalignment, and facial asymmetry. They are commonly used in the planning of orthodontic treatments.

Frequently Asked Questions

Digital x-rays are a modern imaging technique used in dentistry to capture high quality images of a patient’s teeth, gums and jawbone. Unlike traditional x-rays which use film, digital x-rays use digital sensors to capture images that are instantly available for review on a computer screen. Digital X-rays offer several advantages over traditional X-rays, including lower radiation exposure, faster processing times, and clearer images.

Digital x-rays expose patients to fewer x-rays than traditional x-rays. Furthermore, digital X-rays can be taken quickly, which means that patients are exposed to radiation for a shorter period of time.

The frequency of digital x-rays will depend on your individual oral health needs. Typically, patients receive digital x-rays once a year as part of their routine dental exams. However, if you have a history of dental problems or are undergoing certain types of dental treatment, your dentist may recommend more frequent x-rays.

During a digital x-ray procedure, you will be asked to wear a lead apron to protect the rest of your body from radiation exposure. Your dentist or dental hygienist will position the x-ray sensor in your mouth and ask you to remain still while the x-ray is taken. The process is quick and painless.

Yes, you can eat and drink before a digital x-ray. However, you should avoid hard or sticky foods that could damage the x-ray sensor.